Constance Shehan

 shehan

Title

Professor of Sociology

 

Email

cshehan@ufl.edu

 

Office

Ustler Hall 200

 

Hours

By appointment

 

About

Teaching

Research

Publications


About

My research and teaching focus on my interests in gender, families, work, and aging. Much of my research has examined women’s experiences in “work” (both paid labor and unpaid labor in the home), highlighting the causes and consequences of the gendered division of household and family labor and the relationship between women’s work and health. Over the past several years, I’ve been examining the impact of the structural characteristics of jobs on personal and family well-being, focusing on women and men in the ministry. My newest projects focus on gender and aging, particularly women’s roles as caregivers to adult sons with HIV/AIDS and on aging women’s body images.

CV


Teaching

Undergraduate Courses

  • American Families

  • Capstone Course for Women’s Studies Majors

  • Families and Work

  • Individual and Society

  • Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Women Marriages and Families

  • Sociological Perspectives on Women’s Bodies

  • Sociology of Children and Childhood

  • Sociology of Women

  • Work, Occupations, and Professions

Graduate Courses

  • American Families

  • College Teaching and Learning

  • Families and Work

  • Family Theories

  • Feminist Perspectives on Families

  • Feminist Theories

  • Gender, Race, and Class

  • Globalization and Families

  • Jobs and Gender

  • Methods of Social Research

  • Reproductive Justice

  • Work, Occupations, and Professions


Research

Areas of Specialization

  • Sociology of the Family

  • Gender and Gender Stratification

My research focuses on women’s experiences in “work” (both paid labor and unpaid labor in the home) and “family” life (written broadly to include a full range of intimate relationships and household living arrangements). Generally, I have pursued two basic themes: (1) the causes and consequences of the gendered division of household and family labor and (2) the relationship between women’s work and health. Over the past several years, I’ve been examining the impact of the structural characteristics of jobs on personal and family well-being, focusing on women and men in the ministry. Within the next few months I will begin a study of retired couples, focusing on the impact of job loss on men’s and women’s identities and psychological well-being.


Publications